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Is it okay to post your Kids on social media?

Parents nowadays have no issue with posting their kids online. And this happens as soon as a the mother is expectant. We take it out for a photo shoot and with so much delight show off the baby bump. Back in the day a lady being pregnant was considered sacred. You would go for normal check-ups, visit a mid-wives, and perform some simple exercise. The baby bump was only revealed during check-ups, but what is happening nowadays is totally different. Ladies are showing off their tummy as soon as it starts to show by going out for photo shoots and holding baby showers. Its really discouraging that even the male generation are in support of this. What happened to the dads being protective of their children? Some parents post videos, photos and stories of their kids because they are proud of their families and they want to stay connected with their relatives and friends. But how much sharing is too much sharing and what are some of the implications of posting your kids online? Sharing on social media can invade your child’s privacy-When they are young they might not know what their parents are posting about them on social media, and at around the age of 5 years they begin getting concerned about how the rest of the world perceive them. They start getting embarrassed about the posts the parents post about them online. The social media posts might be used for bullying-as a parent you should be concerned of how the rest of the world responds to posts you post about your kid. People might use posts of the child when they were younger to insult, make fun of and bully as they get older. Social media messages can impact your child’s future- it’s very difficult to monitor comments online. You cannot prevent anyone from taking a screenshot of your post and spreading it. Trying to delete a post might not be of help either because those posts go to the internet archive. Exposure to risk of digital kidnapping-This is a type of identity theft. It’s when someone takes photos of a child or even an adult from social media and repurposes them with new names and identities, often claiming the child as their own. Other instances is when the individual responding to comments as the child or from the child’s point-of-view. Your Social Media Posts Might Attract Dangerous People-Photos and videos of children shared by their parents on social media sometimes turn up on disturbing websites and forums, some of them dedicated to child pornography. Social media posts can also provide individuals with personal information like where the child lives, plays, and goes to school. Posts with information like location tags and landmarks give strangers as well as known aggressors the ability to locate a child and other family members.  If you do decide to share about your child’s life online, try and  ask your children what they’re comfortable with you posting about them online. They also need their privacy settings on your social media pages. Choose your photos carefully. Ask friends and family to refrain from posting photos or videos of your child. And start involving your child in deciding what is appropriate to share online about them. Photo Courtesy:  Picture by Stuff.co.nz
  • By Miriam Jomo
  • 2019-05-07
  • Features
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1 Comment

2019 Jun 12 Peter_Mayeku

So far that's a controversial argument which is ongoing.. but i like your point of view, keep it up

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